Projects

For thousands of years, the Spokane River was the lifeblood of the Spokane Tribe. When Grand Coulee Dam was completed in 1942, Lake Roosevelt was created, raising the waters of the Columbia and Spokane Rivers some 70 feet. Traditional fishing sites, burial grounds, and sacred cultural gathering places lay beneath Lake Roosevelt.

There were no options for the people of the Spokane Tribe and no options for the salmon, which were blocked by the dam. The federal government is required to maintain a trust responsibility with tribes. Tribal leaders were told they’d receive reasonable compensation for their losses. The Tribe was paid just $4,700.

For nearly 70 years, the Spokane Tribe of Indians has been negotiating with the federal government over the tribes’ losses due to Grand Coulee Dam.

Video: Grand Coulee and the Forgotten Tribe


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Fish Reintroduction into the U.S. And Canadian Upper Columbia River

Upper Columbia River Basin Fish Passage and Reintroduction Project – Phase 1

Treaty Talks: A Journey up the Columbia River for People and Salmon

Columbia River Listed among Most Endangered Rivers of 2015

20 Year Report

United for the Benefit of All

Grand Coulee and the Forgotten Tribe

UCUT and Bonneville Power Administration Partnership

Columbia River Treaty

Tribal Salmon Management, Harvesting and Sharing

Forests and Fish Report

Drumheller Springs Natural Park

Pow Wow and Community Outreach

OUR COMMUNITY

4 days ago

This is a huge win!

"It’s hard to convey just how important this decision is for the Sinixt people ... They’ve been fighting for generations for recognition in Canada.”

In a major victory for people who are part of the Arrow Lakes (Sinixt) tribe — one of the 12 Confederated Tribes of the Colville...

5 days ago

A federal judge approved a plan Tuesday that will spill more water at Snake and Columbia river dams this spring to help juvenile salmon and steelhead…