Projects

We Are Salmon Nations

For thousands of years, the UCUT were salmon nations and managers of salmon resources, and we still are today. Despite the blockage and extirpation of all salmon and steelhead runs throughout the Upper Columbia River system due to hydropower dam construction and agricultural irrigation projects, the UCUT are still engaged in harvesting and sharing of fisheries’ resources today.

Salmon Harvest and Sharing

In 2010, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) began a comprehensive salmon harvest, sharing, and distribution program for all of the UCUT. The CTCR operates a purse seine boat and other selective, sustainable techniques that are used to harvest tribally-allocated salmon from the Columbia River near Omak, Washington.

In collaboration with BPA, the live capture project seeks to recover wild runs of salmon. Wild-origin fish are released, and the hatchery fish are harvested for tribal members.

As a result, tribal members and staff at all five Member Tribes have the opportunity to learn both modern and traditional fishing techniques. Selective harvest also provides opportunities for individual tribal members who can’t fish for themselves. Tribes above Grand Coulee Dam who don’t have access to fish can partake of the harvest.

The goal is to provide a larger yield of salmon for future generations—for the benefit of everyone.


Watch These Videos About Our Selective Harvest Practices

The Friendliest Catch

The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation have lost fishing opportunities due to the construction of dams. In collaboration with BPA, the live capture project seeks to recover wild runs of salmon. Wild-origin fish are released, and the hatchery fish are harvested for tribal members. The project is teaching tribal members to fish again.

Selective Harvest

When Grand Coulee Dam was built, it destroyed the fisheries of Kettle Falls. The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation moved to selective fishing to harvest fish. This allows them to keep the hatchery fish and release the native fish.

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Upper Columbia River Basin Fish Passage and Reintroduction Project – Phase 1

Treaty Talks: A Journey up the Columbia River for People and Salmon

Columbia River Listed among Most Endangered Rivers of 2015

20 Year Report

United for the Benefit of All

Grand Coulee and the Forgotten Tribe

UCUT and Bonneville Power Administration Partnership

Columbia River Treaty

Tribal Salmon Management, Harvesting and Sharing

Forests and Fish Report

Drumheller Springs Natural Park

Pow Wow and Community Outreach

OUR COMMUNITY

4 days ago

Coeur D'Alene Tribe continues the traditions of traveling by canoes on Lake Coeur D'Alene! Kalispel and Colville Confederated tribal members joined in to help kick off Julyamsh Pow Wow with a canoe ... See more

1 week ago

"The Hanford Reach monument in southeast Washington, includes the last free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River. It’s home to gravel bars where endangered salmon spawn. And it’s home to many ... See more

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryane Zinke announced Thursday that the Hanford Reach National Monument in Washington and Craters of the Moon National